Edmond Audry

Cognac 1930 Edmond Audry

Très Ancien, Fins Bois, Bottle No. 303 of 333, Bottled in 1980's

Provenance: Christies King Street, 12/13/2012

Cognac 1930 Edmond Audry (1703)
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Vintage 1930
Vintage text Presumed 1930's
Alcohol 49.0 %
Bottled 1980's
Button No button
Fill level Top shoulder
Maturation Très Ancien
Packaging No casing
Region Fins Bois
Shape Cognaçaise
Size 70 cl
Unique Bottle No 303 of 333

Cognac

Renowned throughout the world, the production of Cognac has been regulated by its very own AOC since 1909. Only liqueurs from eaux-de-vie made from crus from the controlled appellation area of Cognac can be labelled as such. This liqueur must be distilled and aged on-site in compliance with authorised techniques: double distillation in a copper Charentais still, ageing in oak barrels for a set minimum ageing period.

A good Cognac is subjected to a complex manufacturing process. It is never made from the eau-de-vie of a single cru, but from a `marriage' of eaux-de-vie that vary in age and cru - some as old as a hundred. To establish the age of a Cognac, only the number of years spent in oak casks or barrels are taken into account. As soon as an eau-de-vie is decanted into a glass recipient, it ceases to age. The longer it is left to age, the more a Cognac gains in complexity, fragrance, aromas and taste (spiced, pepper and cinnamon flavours).

Please note that only Cognacs made exclusively from Petite and Grande Champagne (50% minimum) can use the "Fine Champagne" appellation.

Edmond Audry

(We currently have no information available on this brand)
Cognac house

Cognac house 

In 1878, A. Edmond's Cognac house established under by the great-grandfather of the current owner, Bernard Boisson. In 1905, Odette married to Aristide Boisson. After the death of Mr. Boisson in 1950, the family company stopped selling Cognac. They carefully preserve the old inventories in the hope that once the Cognac house will resurrect.

High ratings

High ratings

That day came in 1978 when Bernard Boisson decided to continue the family tradition. Nowadays, they offer the brand in some of the best and most appreciated restaurants in the world. It is also available at the 'better' wine trade and receives high ratings and great reviews from Sommeliers and 'connoisseurs'.

Perfect balance

Perfect balance

"We believe that a great cognac is the fruit of a perfect balance between the bouquet provided by the grapes, the oak coming from the cask and the oxidation due to the surrounding atmosphere in the cellar. A result of the three significant steps in the time-consuming cognac-making process.

The distillation

The distillation

The cognac's method of distillation, based on double heating and successive loads, and the shape of the copper alambic Charentais, or still, are specially designed to optimize the extraction of the bouquet coming from the grapes and directly linked to the terroir. In this process, the so-called swan's neck, which is the pipe conducting the spirit from the boiler to the cooler, plays a significant part.

Nicholas Faith

Nicholas Faith

Indeed the elegantly shaped swan's neck provides a smooth path that releases the bouquet of the wine. So the spirit gets a deep aroma taking full advantage from the grapes. Here we should remember the words of Nicholas Faith in his authoritative book "The Cognac": " The Cognac's essential difference from most other spirits is that its aromatic components derive directly from the grapes.

The maturing

The maturing

The slow natural aging of our cognacs is the compound or mysterious alchemy that takes place between the cognac in the barrel, the oak of the cask, the motionless, silent air in the cellar and the long, relentless march of time. The wood plays a key role. The oak's porosity provides indirect contact between the spirit in the barrel and the surrounding air, so both oak and spirit react. 

Atmosphere

Atmosphere

To achieve the right balance between the bouquet and the woodiness we seldom use new barrels so that the tannin permeates the cognac slowly and progressively. The same is true of slow oxidation which ensures the preservation of the aromatic elements in the spirit, and it surely would be lost in a speedier reaction. The course of time is the crucial factor. In other words, as time goes by the atmosphere in our cellar allows the Cognac to mature and blossom.

The Blend

The Blend

Our Master Blender uses all his skill to select and blend Cognacs that have reached full maturity and whose complementarity qualities are guaranteed to mingle and mellow into a harmonious whole. Once the blend is made we do not bottle it immediately.

marriage

Marriage

For more than two years before being bottled, the parts in the mixture are left together to get acquainted in old barrels having no longer tannin. So they blend and mingle gently, slowly, thoroughly, achieving a seamless, melted, rounded, perfectly balanced Cognac. It takes time for the marriage to be consumed but once it is the result is a harmonious lasting marriage."