• Cognac 1890 Caves du Chapon

Cognac 1890 Caves du Chapon

Presumed 1890's, Réserve spéciale, Fin Bordeaux, Fine Champagne, Bottled in the mid 1960's (presumed)

€ 2,110
Vintage 1890
Vintage text; Presumed 1890's
Alcohol 39 %
Size 70 cl
Region Fine Champagne
Classification Réserve spéciale
Button No button
Casing No casing
Shape Standard

Cognac

Renowned throughout the world, the production of Cognac has been regulated by its very own AOC since 1909. Only liqueurs from eaux-de-vie made from crus from the controlled appellation area of Cognac can be labelled as such. This liqueur must be distilled and aged on-site in compliance with authorised techniques: double distillation in a copper Charentais still, ageing in oak barrels for a set minimum ageing period. A good Cognac is subjected to a complex manufacturing process. It is never made from the eau-de-vie of a single cru, but from a `marriage' of eaux-de-vie that vary in age and cru - some as old as a hundred. To establish the age of a Cognac, only the number of years spent in oak casks or barrels are taken into account. As soon as an eau-de-vie is decanted into a glass recipient, it ceases to age. The longer it is left to age, the more a Cognac gains in complexity, fragrance, aromas and taste (spiced, pepper and cinnamon flavours). Please note that only Cognacs made exclusively from Petite and Grande Champagne (50% minimum) can use the "Fine Champagne" appellation.

Caves du Chapon

Collection of Cognac Restaurant Le Chapon fin

Cognac Cave du Chapon finThis collection of Cognac from the famous culinary institution Chapon fin in Bordeaux was opened in 1825. There has been a significant revival in 1901. When indeed, the new owner of the time, Joseph Sicard asked Bertrand Alfred-Duprat (1841-1905) and his son Cyprien (1876-1933) Bordeaux architects, to redecorate the main room of the restaurant in Art Nouveau style.

The Chapon Fin has seen a number of great figures of the twentieth century. Among them the actress Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) and famous painters Toulouse-Lautrec (1864-1901) and Aristide Briand (1862-1932) and the French Actor Sacha Guitry (1885-1957).

The restaurant was also a popular destination for royalty, Alfonso XIII of Spain was one of the most fervent customers. Other frequent royal visitors where Edward VII, son of Queen Victoria, Manuel II of Portugal and the Sultan of Morocco.

Joseph Sicard closed the restaurant on June 1, 1960, at the age of 89. This was the first restaurant to be awarded three Michelin stars when it first appeared in 1933.