Café Anglais

Cognac 1830 Café Anglais Fine Champagne

Grande Fine Champagne

Provenance: Private purchase

Café Anglais: Opened in 1802, the restaurant was named in honor of the Treaty of Amiens, a peace accord signed between Britain and France. In the beginning, its clientele were coachmen and domestic servants but later became frequented by actors and patrons of the nearby Opera House. In 1822, the new proprietor, Paul Chevreuil, turned it into a fashionable restaurant with a reputation for roasted and grilled meats. It was after the arrival of chef Adolphe Dugléré that the Café Anglais achieved its highest gastronomic reputation. It was then frequented by the wealthy and the aristocracy of Paris. He composed the menu called the "Three Emperors Dinner" in honor of Tsar Alexander II, Kaiser Wilhelm I and Otto von Bismarck for the Exposition Universelle in 1867 in Paris. 1830: France invades Algeria. The revolution of July 1830 created a constitutional monarchy. On August 2, Charles X and his son abdicated their rights to the throne and departed for Great Britain. A distant cousin, Louis Philippe was placed on the throne. He agreed to rule as a constitutional monarch. This period became known as the July Monarchy. This renewed French Revolution lead to separation and the establishment of the Kingdom of Belgium. The United States Congress passes the Indian Removal Act, authorizing the President to negotiate with Native Americans in the United States for their removalfrom their ancestral homelands.

$ 8,499.00

This bottle is being moved to our Davie Warehouse. Leave your email address and we will notify you as it becomes available, and send you a 5% discount code for your next purchase.

World’s Largest collection
3-5 day U.S.A. delivery
Secure payment
Call Us 954-607-7386
Email Us
Size 70 cl
Vintage 1830
Alcohol 40.0 %
Bottled 1900
Button Glass shoulder button
Fill level Low shoulder
Region Grande Fine Champagne
Shape Cognaçaise

Cognac

Renowned throughout the world, the production of Cognac has been regulated by its very own AOC since 1909. Only liqueurs from eaux-de-vie made from crus from the controlled appellation area of Cognac can be labelled as such. This liqueur must be distilled and aged on-site in compliance with authorised techniques: double distillation in a copper Charentais still, ageing in oak barrels for a set minimum ageing period.

A good Cognac is subjected to a complex manufacturing process. It is never made from the eau-de-vie of a single cru, but from a `marriage' of eaux-de-vie that vary in age and cru - some as old as a hundred. To establish the age of a Cognac, only the number of years spent in oak casks or barrels are taken into account. As soon as an eau-de-vie is decanted into a glass recipient, it ceases to age. The longer it is left to age, the more a Cognac gains in complexity, fragrance, aromas and taste (spiced, pepper and cinnamon flavours).

Please note that only Cognacs made exclusively from Petite and Grande Champagne (50% minimum) can use the "Fine Champagne" appellation.

Café Anglais

(We currently have no information available on this brand)

Café Anglais

Old Liquors, Café Anglais

Café Anglais: Opened in 1802, the restaurant was named in honor of the Treaty of Amiens, a peace accord signed between Britain and France. In 1822, the new proprietor, Paul Chevreuil, turned it into a fashionable restaurant with a reputation for roasted and grilled meats. It was after the arrival of chef Adolphe Dugléré that the Café Anglais achieved its highest gastronomic reputation.

Three Emperors

Three Emperors

In 1867, during the Paris World Exhibition, Alexander II, Czar of the Russian Empire, the Czarevitch and future Alexander III, William I, King of Prussia and future Emperor and the Prince Otto von Bismarck sat down at the same table. For these illustrious guests, Dugléré, the Chef, prepared an equally exceptional menu with nothing less than five starters, six main courses and four desserts.

Tour D'Argent

Old Liquors, Tour D'Argent

The Café Anglais was nothing less than the most fashionable and frequented of Parisian establishments of the time. The interior was elaborately decorated with furniture in mahogany and walnut woods, and mirrors of gold leaf patina. Although the Café Anglais closed in 1913, when the building was demolished, the table setting for this dinner is now displayed at La Tour d’Argent, the oldest surviving restaurant in Paris.