Brugerolle Fréres

Cognac 1811 Brugerolle Fréres

Vieille Fine Napoléon, Chateau de Fontainebleu, glass shoulder button 'N'

Provenance: Sotheby's Paris, 2/16/2000

Cognac 1811 Brugerolle Fréres (5768)

Cave de l'Empereur As far back as the late 1700s, the Brugerolle family were farming the vines, producing eaux-de-vie and beginning to supply their products to local businesses. The founder of the cognac house, Leopold Brugerolle, not only supplied restaurants around the country – including those in Paris – but also found his cognac being requisitioned by French military officers. By 1847, Cognac Brugerolle had established itself in Matha, Charente Maritime, and continued to produce a wide range of cognacs. The house was passed down through the generations, along with the secrets and traditions of each cellar master from father to son. In 1987 the house of Cognac Brugerolle was incorporated into the Compagnie de Guyenne (CDG). This is the collaboration created by Meukow Cognac, which along with marketing their own cognacs, concentrates on sustaining smaller, family run cognac houses and providing them with the distribution network and might of a larger corporation. 1811 was regarded at the time as the greatest vintage in living memory, and is now universally held to be the finest vintage of the 19th century throughout the vineyards of Western Europe. In the same year, Napoleon himself visited the region, and was presented with a barrel of cognac as a gift for his young son. Many ascribed the extraordinary weather to the remarkable astronomical event that had dominated the year. The exceptional quality of 1811 cognac was recognised immediately, and the leading producers marked the vintage either with the date on the bottle, or, more unusually, with a picture of the comet forever associated with the vintage. The date "1811" or the star (as the comet symbol soon became) were regarded as signs of infallible quality, and the leading producers were not slow to exploit this. The Russian Empire removes Anton II, Catholicos Patriarch of Georgia, from his office, placing a Russian-appointed bishop at the head of the Georgian church. The Argentine Government declares freedom of expression for the press.

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Vintage 1811
Alcohol 39.0 %
Button Glass shoulder button
Classification Napoléon
Fill level High shoulder
Maturation Vieille
Packaging No casing
Region Fine Champagne
Seal Original cork
Size 70 cl

Cognac

Renowned throughout the world, the production of Cognac has been regulated by its very own AOC since 1909. Only liqueurs from eaux-de-vie made from crus from the controlled appellation area of Cognac can be labelled as such. This liqueur must be distilled and aged on-site in compliance with authorised techniques: double distillation in a copper Charentais still, ageing in oak barrels for a set minimum ageing period.

A good Cognac is subjected to a complex manufacturing process. It is never made from the eau-de-vie of a single cru, but from a `marriage' of eaux-de-vie that vary in age and cru - some as old as a hundred. To establish the age of a Cognac, only the number of years spent in oak casks or barrels are taken into account. As soon as an eau-de-vie is decanted into a glass recipient, it ceases to age. The longer it is left to age, the more a Cognac gains in complexity, fragrance, aromas and taste (spiced, pepper and cinnamon flavours).

Please note that only Cognacs made exclusively from Petite and Grande Champagne (50% minimum) can use the "Fine Champagne" appellation.

Brugerolle Fréres

As far back as the late 1700s, the Brugerolle family were farming the vines, producing eaux-de-vie and beginning to supply their products to local businesses. The founder of the cognac house, Leopold Brugerolle, not only supplied restaurants around the country – including those in Paris – but also found his cognac being requisitioned by French military officers. By 1847, Cognac Brugerolle had established itself in Matha, Charente Maritime, and continued to produce a wide range of cognacs. The house was passed down through the generations, along with the secrets and traditions of each cellar master from father to son. In 1987 the house of Cognac Brugerolle was incorporated into the Compagnie de Guyenne (CDG). This is the collaboration created by Meukow Cognac, which along with marketing their own cognacs, concentrates on sustaining smaller, family run cognac houses and providing them with the distribution network and might of a larger corporation.